A Moment of Kindness, or that pivotal moment that keeps the reader reading

by henandinkblots

No matter how small or how grand a gesture, showing your character's act of kindness humanizes even the doggiest of us all. Or maybe, rather, it doggifies even the most human of us all. For the record, Sacha, pictured about to save the non-drowning person (in no danger) WOULD Save The Cat.

No matter how small or how grand a gesture, showing your character’s act of kindness humanizes even the doggiest of us all. Or maybe, rather, it doggifies even the most human of us all. For the record, Sacha, pictured about to save the non-drowning person (in no danger) WOULD Save The Cat.

 

This is a short note about empathy. Character empathy. I see a lot of texts where a character (primary and secondary as well) blithely starts his or her story with no thought of the reader. How selfish! As one who reads lots of texts (this goes for everything from a picture book* to all fiction and even non-fiction), I can tell you this disregard for the reader is off-putting and I, for one, have no problem closing a book or rejecting a manuscript where I don’t feel empathy for the character.

                 As readers we need well-rounded character and we need to experience the good, and the bad of the characters, we are following in a story. In the case of the main character, we need to identify with her/him (I’d guess 99.9% of the time that’s with the good stuff). But if a story starts out and we don’t see or experience any redeeming qualities in a character, we aren’t quite as interested in sticking around.

                If she’s grumpy or he’s mean-spirited, albeit with reason, or they are all so dark that even your phone’s flashlight won’t help to see more clearly, we need to understand without a doubt why it’s worth our time (and our money) to keep reading. We need to empathize with the character. Identify with the character. And to do this, we need something that is so basic, it’s almost crazy it’s missed so often.

No matter the hi-tech, smoke-and-mirrors on the page, what is so frequently forgotten/left out is that we need to see, what author/screenwriter Blake Snyder refers to as the SAVE THE CAT scene. It’s the small moment when we meet the main character and s/he does something redeeming, like pull the baby out of the fire, the spider out of the drain, give the homeless kid a bagel. It’s that pivotal scene that defines our character and makes the reader like him or her. And it can be a small moment, but it must be a redeeming moment.

After that, if she’s grumpy or he’s a bastard to his friend or she can’t get out of bed because she’s so depressed, we know this is temporary because WE’VE SEEN THE TRUE PERSON just a few lines above. She rescued the puppy from the oncoming train! He carried the bag of groceries up the three flights of stairs for his neighbor on crutches. She taught the kindergarten bully to read. And we care about that character. We empathize.

So this is a plea to writers — and illustrators* — everywhere to give readers that small offering, so that we want to see what happens to this character we care about. So that we finish the manuscript. Finish the book. Make us care and stick around.

 

[If you’ve already read or haven’t yet read SAVE THE CAT by Blake Snyder, I encourage you to take a look at it. It was published in 2005 by Michael Wiese Productions, www.mwp.com.]

 

Erzsi DEAK is an author (*see how Doug Cushman gave us the SAVE THE CAT moment in their book, PUMPKIN TIME! and write in to tell us about it), an agent to a Coopful of talented authors and illustrators, and the founder of Hen&ink Literary Studio. Feel free to LIKE us on Facebook and anywhere else! 🙂